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Myeloperoxidase Is Associated with Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Overweight Subjects with First-Degree Relatives with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Anel Gómez García, Mireya Rivera Rodríguez, Carlos Gómez Alonso, Daysi Yazmin Rodríguez Ochoa, Cleto Alvarez Aguilar
Diabetes Metab J. 2015;39(1):59-65.   Published online February 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2015.39.1.59
  • 4,543 View
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  • 36 Web of Science
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of risk factors for that in future a subject can develop diabetes. Insulin resistance (IR) is important in the pathogenesis of T2DM. There is evidence that oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology and/or progression of diabetes. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) participates in developing of inflammation. The objective was to investigate if MPO is associated with IR and inflammation in individuals with first-degree relatives of T2DM.

Methods

Cross-sectional study in 84 overweight individuals with family history of T2DM divided in two groups according to IR, group with IR (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA] ≥2.5; n=43) and control group (CG; HOMA <2.5; n=41). Complete clinical history and a venous blood sample were collected for measuring glucose and lipids profile, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), MPO, glutathione reductase (GRd), glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase.

Results

MPO, TNF-α, and IL-6 were higher in patients with IR than in CG (MPO: 308.35 [190.85 to 445.42] vs. 177.35 [104.50 to 279.85], P=0.0001; TNF-α: 13.46 [10.58 to 18.88] vs. 9.39 [7.53 to 11.25], P=0.0001; IL-6: 32.93 [24.93 to 38.27] vs. 15.60 [12.93 to 26.27]; P=0.0001, respectively). MPO was associated with IR (rho de Spearman=0.362, P=0.001). In the analysis of lineal regression, MPO predicts IR (β, 0.263; t, 2.520; P=0.014). In the univariate analysis, MPO had an odds ratio of 9.880 for risk of IR (95% confidence interval, 2.647 to 36.879).

Conclusion

MPO had relation with IR and inflammation parameters in overweight subjects with first-degree relatives of T2DM. We need studies on a casual relationship and molecular mechanisms among the increased serum MPO levels, inflammation markers, and IR.

Citations

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The Effects of Resistance Training on Muscle and Body Fat Mass and Muscle Strength in Type 2 Diabetic Women
Hwi Ryun Kwon, Kyung Ah Han, Yun Hyi Ku, Hee Jung Ahn, Bo-Kyung Koo, Ho Chul Kim, Kyung Wan Min
Korean Diabetes J. 2010;34(2):101-110.   Published online April 30, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2010.34.2.101
  • 5,385 View
  • 74 Download
  • 56 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

Our goal was to investigate the effects of low intensity resistance training on body fat, muscle mass and strength, cardiovascular fitness, and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes.

Methods

Twenty-eight overweight women with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to a resistance training group (RG, n = 13) or a control group (CG, n = 15). RG performed resistance training using elastic bands, of which strength was equal to 40 to 50% of one repetition maximum (1RM), for three days per week. Each exercise consisted of three sets for 60 minutes. We assessed abdominal fat using computed tomography, muscle mass using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and muscle strength using Keiser's chest and leg press. Insulin sensitivity was measured using the insulin tolerance test, and aerobic capacity was expressed as oxygen uptake at the anaerobic threshold (AT-VO2) before and after the 12-week exercise program.

Results

The age of participants was 56.4 ± 7.1 years, duration of diabetes was 5.9 ± 5.5 years, and BMI was 27.4 ± 2.5 kg/m2, without significant differences between two groups. During intervention, a greater increase in muscle mass and greater decreases in both total fat mass and abdominal fat were observed in RG compared to those of CG (P = 0.015, P = 0.011, P = 0.010, respectively). Increase in 1RM of upper and lower extremities was observed in the RG (P = 0.004, P = 0.040, respectively), without changes in AT-VO2 and insulin resistance in either group.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the low intensity resistance training was effective in increasing muscle mass and strength and reducing total fat mass without change of insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic patients.

Citations

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    Lance E. Davidson, David E. Kelley, Stanley Heshka, John Thornton, F. Xavier Pi-Sunyer, Lawrence Boxt, Ashok Balasubramanyam, Dympna Gallagher
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    Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging.2013; 33(5): 344.     CrossRef
  • Predicting Aerobic Fitness Improvements after Participation in a Hybrid Supervised and Home-Based Exercise Program in People with Type 2 Diabetes
    Pearl Yang, Paul Oh
    Canadian Journal of Diabetes.2013; 37(6): 388.     CrossRef
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    Ciro José Brito, Edmar Lacerda Mendes, Aparecido Pimentel Ferreira, Sérgio Oliveira De Paula, Otávio de Tolêdo Nóbrega, Cláudio Córdova
    Motriz: Revista de Educação Física.2013; 19(2): 313.     CrossRef
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    Barbara Strasser, Dominik Pesta
    BioMed Research International.2013; 2013: 1.     CrossRef
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    B. Strasser, M. Arvandi, U. Siebert
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  • The effects of resistance training on ApoB/ApoA-I ratio, Lp(a) and inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes
    Nikolaos P. E. Kadoglou, Grigorios Fotiadis, Zoi Athanasiadou, Ioulia Vitta, Stylianos Lampropoulos, Ioannis S. Vrabas
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    I. Ismail, S. E. Keating, M. K. Baker, N. A. Johnson
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  • Aging, Resistance Training, and Diabetes Prevention
    Kyle D. Flack, Kevin P. Davy, Matthew W. Hulver, Richard A. Winett, Madlyn I. Frisard, Brenda M. Davy
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  • The Effects of Aerobic/Resistance Exercise on Body Fat Mass, Muscle Strength and Endothelial Function in Korean Type 2 Diabetes mellitus Patients
    Kyung Wan Min
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  • Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes
    Sheri R. Colberg, Ronald J. Sigal, Bo Fernhall, Judith G. Regensteiner, Bryan J. Blissmer, Richard R. Rubin, Lisa Chasan-Taber, Ann L. Albright, Barry Braun
    Diabetes Care.2010; 33(12): e147.     CrossRef
Randomized Controlled Trials
The Effects of Low-Calorie Diets on Abdominal Visceral Fat, Muscle Mass, and Dietary Quality in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Subjects.
Hee Jung Ahn, Youn Ok Cho, Hwi Ryun Kwon, Yun Hyi Ku, Bo Kyung Koo, Kyung Ah Han, Kyung Wan Min
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(6):526-536.   Published online December 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.6.526
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Weight loss through low-calorie diets (LCDs) decreases visceral fat (VF). However, the effects on muscle mass, changes of dietary quality, and insulin sensitivity are unknown for Korean obese type 2 diabetic subjects. Therefore, this study examined such effects of LCDs. METHODS: A total of 30 obese type 2 diabetic subjects (body mass index, 27.0 +/- 2.2 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to an LCD or control group. Subjects on LCDs took 500~1,000 kcal fewer energy than their usual dietary intake (1,000~1,500 kcal/day) over the course of 12 weeks. The abdominal VF and femoral muscle mass were evaluated by computed tomography, and insulin sensitivity was assessed using an insulin tolerance test (Kitt; rate constant for plasma glucose disappearance, %/min). Dietary nutrient intake consumed by subjects was assessed by 3-day food records. RESULTS: The percent VF reduction was -23.4 +/- 17.2% in the LCD group and -9.8 +/- 11.8% in the control group after 12 weeks (P < 0.001, P = 0.002). However, significant decrease in femoral mass or proportional change of marcronutrient intake and mean adequacy ratio were not found in the LCD group, as compared to the control group. Insulin sensitivity improved in the LCD group, as compared to the control group (P = 0.040). CONCLUSION: LCD effectively improved insulin sensitivity and reduced abdominal VF without reduction of femoral muscle and dietary quality in obese type 2 diabetic subjects.

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  • The association between measurement sites of visceral adipose tissue and cardiovascular risk factors after caloric restriction in obese Korean women
    Hye-Ok Lee, Jung-Eun Yim, Jeong-Sook Lee, Young-Seol Kim, Ryowon Choue
    Nutrition Research and Practice.2013; 7(1): 43.     CrossRef
  • Effects of age on changes of body composition through caloric restriction in overweight and obese women
    Jung-Eun Yim, Young-Seol Kim, Ryowon Choue
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2013; 46(5): 410.     CrossRef
  • The effects of weight loss by a low-calorie diet and a low-calorie plus exercise in overweight undergraduate students
    Gun-Ae Yoon, Hyun-Ho Ahn, Bo-Hae Park, Danbi Yoo, Sunmin Park
    Korean Journal of Nutrition.2012; 45(4): 315.     CrossRef
  • Effect of an abdominal obesity management program on dietary intake, stress index, and waist to hip ratio in abdominally obese women - Focus on comparison of the WHR decrease and WHR increase groups -
    Ji Won Lee, Sook Young Yoo, So Young Yang, Hyesook Kim, Seong Kyung Cho
    Korean Journal of Nutrition.2012; 45(2): 127.     CrossRef
  • The Evaluation of Workplace Obesity Intervention Program using Six Sigma Methodology
    Ji Yeon Kang, Ill Keun Park, Yun Kyun Chang, Sook Hee Sung, Yoo Kyoung Park, Sang Woon Cho, Yun Mi Paek, Tae In Choi
    The Korean Journal of Obesity.2011; 20(4): 193.     CrossRef
  • The Usefulness of an Accelerometer for Monitoring Total Energy Expenditure and Its Clinical Application for Predicting Body Weight Changes in Type 2 Diabetic Korean Women
    Ji Yeon Jung, Kyung Ah Han, Hwi Ryun Kwon, Hee Jung Ahn, Jae Hyuk Lee, Kang Seo Park, Kyung Wan Min
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(6): 374.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Low-Calorie Diets on Abdominal Visceral Fat, Muscle Mass, and Dietary Quality in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Subjects (Korean Diabetes J 2009;33:526-36)
    Won-Young Lee
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(1): 66.     CrossRef
Effects of Adding omega-3 Fatty Acids to Simvastatin on Lipids, Lipoprotein Size and Subspecies in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Hypertriglyceridemia.
Won Jun Kim, Chang Beom Lee, Cheol Young Park, Se Eun Park, Eun Jung Rhee, Won Young Lee, Ki Won Oh, Sung Woo Park, Dae Jung Kim, Hae Jin Kim, Seung Jin Han, Hong Keum Cho
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(6):494-502.   Published online December 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.6.494
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
omega-3 fatty acids are known to improve lipid profiles, the distribution of lipoprotein subclasses, and secondary prevention against post-myocardial infarction. Rare reports have emerged of synergistic results of omega-3 fatty acids with simvastatin in cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus with hypertriglyceridemia. The purpose of this study was to determine the combined relationship of omega-3 fatty acids plus simvastatin on lipid, lipoprotein size and the types of subspecies. METHODS: This randomized, multi-center, comparison study evaluated eight weeks of combination therapy (omega-3 fatty acids (Omacor) 4 g/day plus simvastatin 20 mg/day) or monotherapy (simvastatin 20 mg/day) for at least six weeks in 62 diabetic patients. Subjects with a triglyceride concentration of more than 200 mg/dL were eligible for inclusion. RESULTS: No significant differences for omega-3 fatty acids + simvastatin versus simvastatin alone were observed for triglycerides (-22.7% vs. -14.3%, P = 0.292), HDL peak particle size (+2.8% vs. -0.4%, P = 0.076), LDL mean particle size (+0.4% vs -0.1%, P = 0.376) or LDL subspecies types, although the combination therapy showed a tendency toward lower triglycerides, larger HDL, and LDL particle sizes than did the monotherapy. There were no significant differences between the two groups in regard to HDL-C, LDL-C, or HbA1c levels. There were no serious adverse events and no abnormalities in the laboratory values associated with this study. CONCLUSION: omega-3 fatty acids were a safeform of treatment in hypertriglyceridemic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. But, regarding efficacy, a much larger sample size and longer-term follow-up may be needed to distinguish between the effects of combination therapy and monotherapy.
Original Articles
The Relationship Between Coronary Artery Calcification and Serum Apolipoprotein A-1 in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.
Hyun Ae Seo, Yeon Kyung Choi, Jae Han Jeon, Jung Eun Lee, Ji Yun Jeong, Seong Su Moon, In Kyu Lee, Bo Wan Kim, Jung Guk Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(6):485-493.   Published online December 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.6.485
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing annually and patient mortality is high. Coronary artery calcification is a predictor of coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular events, which are the main cause of death in type 2 diabetes patients, may be preventable by addressing risk factors associated with coronary artery calcification. We examined the relationships between coronary artery calcification, lipid profiles, and apolipoprotein levels. METHODS: We calculated the coronary calcium scores (CCS) of 254 subjects with type 2 diabetes (113 males, 141 females) via multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT). Height, body weight, blood pressure, HbA1c, c-peptide, lipid profile and apolipoprotein were assessed concurrently. RESULTS: In patients with type 2 diabetes, Agatston score and apolipoprotein A-1 were significantly negatively correlated in both males and females (males P = 0.015, females P = 0.021). The negative correlation between Agatston score and apolipoprotein A-1 was retained for the entire patient sample after adjustments for age and sex (P = 0.022). Stepwise multiple regression anaylses with the Agatston score as the dependent variable indicate that apolipoprotein A-1 is a independent predictor (beta coefficient = -0.047, 95%CI = -0.072 ~ -0.021, P < 0.001) of coronary artery calcification. CONCLUSION: The results of our study suggest that apolipoprotein A-1 is a useful independent indicator of coronary artery calcification.

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  • The Risk of Coronary Artery Calcification according to Different Lipid Parameters and Average Lipid Parameters
    Tae Kyung Yoo, Mi Yeon Lee, Ki-Chul Sung
    Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Coronary Artery Calcification and Serum Apolipoprotein A-1 in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
    Ki Won Oh
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(6): 464.     CrossRef
Leptin is Negatively Associated with Femoral Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Jae Han Jeon, Yeun Kyung Choi, Hyun Ae Seo, Jung Eun Lee, Ji Yun Jeong, Seong Su Moon, Ju Young Lee, Jung Guk Kim, Bo Wan Kim, In Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(5):421-431.   Published online October 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.5.421
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Serum leptin level and bone mineral density (BMD) are widely assumed to be positively associated with body fat mass. Numerous attempts have been made to document the relationship between leptin and BMD, but the results are inconsistent, especially in diabetic patients. METHODS: A total of 60 Korean postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus were included in the present study. The BMDs of lumbar spines (L1 to L4) and proximal femurs (trochanter, neck, and total) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and biochemical markers including leptin, HbA1c, C-peptide and urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured for each patient. RESULTS: Negative associations between leptin and BMD of femoral neck, trochanter, and total femur in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus were documented in a model adjusted for age, body fat mass, and fasting insulin level (r = -0.308, P = 0.020 and r = - 0.303, P = 0.025 and r = - 0.290, P = 0.032 respectively). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed revealing negative associations between leptin and BMD of the femoral neck (beta = -0.369), trochanter (beta = -0.324), and total femur (beta = -0.317). CONCLUSION: The results of the present study suggest a negative relationship between leptin and femoral BMD. In addition, leptin may have a negative effect on BMD in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

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  • Evaluation of bone mineral density in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients before and after treatment
    MK Dutta, R Pakhetra, MK Garg
    Medical Journal Armed Forces India.2012; 68(1): 48.     CrossRef
Maximal Muscle Strength Deteriorates with Age in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Hwi Ryun Kwon, Yun Hyi Ku, Hee Jung Ahn, Ji Yun Jeong, Sang Ryol Ryu, Bo Kyung Koo, Kyung Ah Han, Kyung Wan Min
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(5):412-420.   Published online October 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.5.412
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
It is difficult to improve muscle strength with only aerobic exercise training in type 2 diabetes patients. Resistance training is effective for improving muscle mass, muscle strength and insulin sensitivity. One repetition maxima (1RM), or the maximum amount of weight a subject can lift in a single repetition, may be a useful unit for evaluating the results of resistance training in type 2 diabetic patients. This study was aimed to assess baseline values for 1RM in a sample of Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus patients that are scaled for intensity and load of exercise, and to assess the relationship of 1RM to age. METHODS: A total of 266 (male: 95, female: 171) Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were included in the study sample. Maximal muscle strength was assessed by measuring 1RM for each subject (KEISER, Fresno, CA, USA). Two different exercises were used to measure 1RM: the chest press for the upper extremities, and the leg press for the lower extremities. RESULTS: Both upper and lower values of 1RM decreased with age in men and women; upper 1RM: r = -0.454, P<0.001 in men, r = -0.480, P< 0.001 in women, lower 1RM: r = -0.569, P<0.001 in men, and r = -0.452, P<0.001 in women. Values of 1RM significantly decreased in men only after the age of 70. In women, values of 1RM continuously decreased after the age of 60. CONCLUSION: The maximal muscle strength of individuals with type 2 diabetes decreases with age. We believe that resistance training is especially beneficial for type 2 diabetes mellitus patients after the sixth decade of life.

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  • The Effects of Floor-seated Exercise Program on Physical Fitness, Depression, and Sleep in Older Adults: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
    Min-Jung Choi, Kyeong-Yae Sohng
    International Journal of Gerontology.2018; 12(2): 116.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Aerobic/Resistance Exercise on Body Fat Mass, Muscle Strength and Endothelial Function in Korean Type 2 Diabetes mellitus Patients
    Kyung Wan Min
    Journal of Korean Diabetes.2011; 12(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • The Correlations between Extremity Circumferences with Total and Regional Amounts of Skeletal Muscle and Muscle Strength in Obese Women with Type 2 Diabetes
    Hwi Ryun Kwon, Kyung Ah Han, Hee Jung Ahn, Jae Hyuk Lee, Gang Seo Park, Kyung Wan Min
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(4): 374.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Resistance Training on Muscle and Body Fat Mass and Muscle Strength in Type 2 Diabetic Women
    Hwi Ryun Kwon, Kyung Ah Han, Yun Hyi Ku, Hee Jung Ahn, Bo-Kyung Koo, Ho Chul Kim, Kyung Wan Min
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(2): 101.     CrossRef
  • Relationship of Maximal Muscle Strength with Body Mass Index and Aerobics Capacity in Type 2 Diabetic Patients
    Hwi Ryun Kwon, Kyung Ah Han, Yun Hyi Ku, Hee Jung Ahn, Bo Kyung Koo, Kyung Wan Min
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(6): 511.     CrossRef
Randomized Controlled Trial
Effects of Aerobic Exercise Intensity on Insulin Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Yun Hyi Ku, Bo Kyung Koo, Hee Jung Ahn, Ji Yun Jeong, Hee Geum Seok, Ho Chul Kim, Kyung Ah Han, Kyung Wan Min
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(5):401-411.   Published online October 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.5.401
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Exercise offers protection against atherosclerosis and insulin resistance. We evaluated the benefits of exercise at different levels of intensity for ameliorating inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and insulin resistance in a sample of type 2 diabetic subjects. METHODS: Fifty-nine overweight women with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to control (CG, N = 18), moderate-intensity exercise (MEG, N = 17), and vigorous-intensity exercise (VEG, N = 14) groups. Patients in the two experimental groups completed a 12-week exercise program, with their exercise activities monitored by accelerometers. We assessed the patients' body weights, total abdominal fat (TF), subcutaneous fat (SF) and visceral fat (VF) via computed tomography, measurements of plasma levels of hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), assessment of endothelial function by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and evaluation of insulin sensitivity by insulin tolerance tests, at baseline, at the end of the 12-week interventions, and one year after initiation of the study. RESULTS: At baseline, the average age of all subjects was 54 +/- 7 years, and average body mass index (BMI) was 26.9 +/- 2.5 kg/m2. During the intervention, patients in the MEG and VEG groups expended comparable amounts of activity-related calories (488.6 +/- 111.9 kcal/day, 518.8 +/- 104.1 kcal/day, respectively). Although BMI, TF, and SF decreased similarly in the MEG and VEG groups (deltaBMI: -1.1 +/- 0.7, -0.8 +/- 0.5, deltaTF: -4,647 +/- 3,613 mm2, -2,577 +/- 2,872 mm2, deltaSF: -2,057 +/- 2,021 mm2, -1,141 +/- 1,825 mm2, respectively), compared to control (P<0.01), hs-CRP, IL-6, and FMD remained constant in both exercise groups even after completion of the 12-week exercise intervention. Insulin sensitivity improved only in patients subjected to vigorous exercise (VEG). Visceral fat loss was observed only in patients subjected to moderate exercise (MEG). At one-year follow up, these values had all returned to baseline. CONCLUSION: Exercise vigorous enough to result in significant weight and fat reduction did not ameliorate inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as measured at the end of a 12-week exercise intervention, nor did it result in sustained improvements in insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic subjects.

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  • The anti-inflammatory effects of aerobic exercise training in patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Georgia Papagianni, Chrystalla Panayiotou, Michail Vardas, Nikolaos Balaskas, Constantinos Antonopoulos, Dimitrios Tachmatzidis, Triantafyllos Didangelos, Vaia Lambadiari, Nikolaos P.E. Kadoglou
    Cytokine.2023; 164: 156157.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Exercise on Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
    Xiaoke Chen, Xinzheng Sun, Chenghao Wang, Hui He, Jos L. Quiles
    Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Diabetic Dietary Education Program on Diabetes Knowledge and Dietary Behaviors of Elderly Diabetic Patients
    Ji Young Ye, Sung Hee Min, Min June Lee
    Korean Journal of Food & Cookery Science.2017; 33(5): 601.     CrossRef
  • Effect of aerobic exercise intensity on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of head-to-head randomized trials
    Yilina Liubaoerjijin, Tasuku Terada, Kevin Fletcher, Normand G. Boulé
    Acta Diabetologica.2016; 53(5): 769.     CrossRef
  • Letter: Effects of Aerobic Exercise Intensity on Insulin Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (Korean Diabetes J 33(5):401-411, 2009)
    Dong-Lim Kim
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(6): 547.     CrossRef
  • Response: Effects of Aerobic Exercise Intensity on Insulin Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (Korean Diabetes J 33:(5)401-411, 2009)
    Yun Hyi Ku, Bo-Kyung Koo, Kyung-Wan Min
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(6): 549.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Risk of Chronic Complications in Koreans with Type 2 Diabetes.
Hye Soo Chung, Ji A Seo, Sin Gon Kim, Nan Hee Kim, Doo Man Kim, Choon Hee Chung, Dong seop Choi
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(5):392-400.   Published online October 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.5.392
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
We examined the relationships between components of metabolic syndrome at the time of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and the development of chronic complications in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: The medical records of patients with type 2 diabetes who had undergone treatment for at least five years prior were collected from 10 general hospitals in Korea. Among a total of 1,418 patients reviewed for possible inclusion in this study, 603 patients were selected, and the occurrence of complications among these patients was evaluated. RESULTS: Among the 603 patients (male, 253; female, 350), 154 males (60.8%) and 266 females (76.0%) were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome at the time of initial diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. The incidence of chronic complications (average follow-up 15.2 +/- 4.9 years) included 60 cases of coronary artery disease (CAD), 57 cases of cerebrovascular accident (CVA), 268 cases of diabetic retinopathy (DR), 254 cases of diabetic nephropathy (DN), and 238 cases of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). As compared to patients without metabolic syndrome, the adjusted relative risks (95% CI) of incidental diabetic complications in patients with metabolic syndrome were 3.28 (1.40~7.71) for CAD, 2.04 (0.86~4.82) for CVA, 1.53 (1.10~2.14) for DR, 1.90 (1.29~2.80) for DN, and 1.51, (1.06~2.14) for DPN. With the addition of just one constituent of metabolic syndrome, the relative risk of developing CAD, CVD, DR, DN, and DPN increased by 2.08 (95% CI, 1.27~3.40), 1.16 (0.80~1.66), 1.09 (0.93~1.26), 1.29 (1.06~1.57) and 1.06 (0.87~1.26), respectively. CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing both macrovascular and microvascular complications.

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  • COVID-19 pandemic: Effects of national lockdown on the state of health of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Moroccan population
    Hamid Farhane, Majida Motrane, Fatima-Ezzahra Anaibar, Aïcha Motrane, Said Nassor Abeid, Nourdin Harich
    Primary Care Diabetes.2021; 15(5): 772.     CrossRef
  • Profil clinique du syndrome métabolique et facteurs associés à sa présence au cours du diabète de type 2 à Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)
    O. Guira, H. Tiéno, Y. Sagna, P. Mayodé, D. Yanogo, L. Zoungrana, C.-G. Kyélem, M.-T. Yaméogo, J.-Y. Drabo
    Médecine des Maladies Métaboliques.2016; 10(1): 70.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and Quality of Life in Korean Adult Women
    Hyung-Su Park, Jong Park
    The Journal of the Korea institute of electronic communication sciences.2013; 8(4): 639.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes Risk Analysis Model with Personalized Food Intake Preference
    So-Hye Jeon, Nam-Hyun Kim
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(11): 5771.     CrossRef
  • Comorbidity Study on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Using Data Mining
    Hye Soon Kim, A Mi Shin, Mi Kyung Kim, Yoon Nyun Kim
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2012; 27(2): 197.     CrossRef
  • Cardio-Metabolic Features of Type 2 Diabetes Subjects Discordant in the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome
    Sa Rah Lee, Ying Han, Ja Won Kim, Ja Young Park, Ji Min Kim, Sunghwan Suh, Mi-Kyoung Park, Hye-Jeong Lee, Duk Kyu Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2012; 36(5): 357.     CrossRef
Genetic Association of Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphisms with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Tae Su Han, Jee Hye Choi, Jina Park, Kwang Ho Lee, Ae Ja Park
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(5):382-391.   Published online October 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.5.382
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Although many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of mtDNA have been found to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the results of studies using different population samples and different methods are mixed. Therefore, we conducted a genetic association study of mtDNA SNPs and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Korean sample and compared our results with those of studies conducted in other human populations. METHODS: A total of 298 blood samples from 147 type 2 diabetic patients and 151 normal controls were surveyed for SNPs via PCR directed sequencing. Sequencing analyses were performed using the SeqMan module of the DNASTAR program. The identified SNPs were compared to previously reported SNP lists on NCBI and V-mitoSNP. RESULTS: A total of 24 SNPs were identified in the MT-RNR2, MR-TL1 and MT-ND1 mtDNA genes in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and normal controls. The SNPs identified in the Korean sample were not closely associated with the type 2 diabetes mellitus phenotype, a significantly different result from those previously observed in European, Chinese and Japanese samples. Additionally, a haplotype and prevalence analysis could not detect any differences between the type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and normal controls. CONCLUSION: The 24 mtDNA SNPs were not associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus risk in our Korean sample. The results of the present study support the possibility that mtDNA SNPs have a differential effect on the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus according to geographical origin.
Association Between Volume of Bowls and the Dietary Intakes in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes.
Hee Jung Ahn, Bo Kyung Koo, Ji Yeon Jung, Hwi Ryun Kwon, Mi Yeon Chung, Yun Hyi Ku, Jin Taek Kim, Kyung Ah Han, Kyung Wan Min
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(4):335-343.   Published online August 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.4.335
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The results of previous studies suggest that portion size is a major factor dictating dietary energy intake. We investigated the relationship between frequencies of rice meals, bowl volumes, and dietary energy intake in a sample of patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 203 type 2 diabetes patients were enrolled in the study. A one-week food diary was collected from each patient and used to assess the types of meal consumed as well as the context of consumption. The volumes of the eating vessels (rice, soup and side dish bowls) used by each patient were obtained by comparisons to measuring cylinders, and dietary energy and macronutrient intake were estimated for each patient by consulting three-day dietary records. RESULTS: The mean age of the 203 subjects (male: 76, female: 127) was 53.9 +/- 9.1 years and the average body mass index (BMI) was 25.6 +/- 4.2 kg/m2. Among the subjects who ate three times per day, 96.4% consumed rice more than twice out of three meals. The median volume of rice bowls used by patients was 350 cc, of soup bowls was 530 cc and of side dish bowls was 260 cc. Portion size, as estimated by rice bowl volume, was not associated with BMI. Male subjects tended to eat out of larger rice and soup bowls (P < 0.001). Portion size was correlated with energy intake from rice (P = 0.021), but not with total energy intake (kcal/kg/day), especially in male subjects. CONCLUSION: Portion size of rice bowl was correlated with energy intake from rice, but not with total energy intake in male subjects with type 2 diabetes. To design effective meal planning methods for patients with type 2 diabetes, further prospective studies are warranted to investigate causative relationships between portion size andmetabolic conditions as well as variation by gender.

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  • Trends in adherence to dietary recommendations among Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus patients
    Kyong Park
    Nutrition Research and Practice.2015; 9(6): 658.     CrossRef
  • Small Rice Bowl-Based Meal Plan for Energy and Marcronutrient Intake in Korean Men with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study
    Hee Jung Ahn, Kyung Ah Han, Jin Young Jang, Jae Hyuk Lee, Kang Seo Park, Kyung Wan Min
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(3): 273.     CrossRef
  • Nutrients and Dish Intake by Fasting Blood Glucose Level
    Jihyun Choi, Hyun-Kyung Moon
    The Korean Journal of Nutrition.2010; 43(5): 463.     CrossRef
  • Small Rice Bowl-Based Meal Plan versus Food Exchange-Based Meal Plan for Weight, Glucose and Lipid Control in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Patients
    Hee-Jung Ahn, Kyung-Ah Han, Hwi-Ryun Kwon, Bo-Kyung Koo, Hyun-Jin Kim, Kang-Seo Park, Kyung-Wan Min
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(2): 86.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Small Sized Rice Bowl on Carbohydrate Intake and Dietary Patterns in Women with Type 2 Diabetes
    Hee-Jung Ahn, Yu-Kyung Eom, Kyung-Ah Han, Hwi-Ryun Kwon, Hyun Jin Kim, Kang Seo Park, Kyung-Wan Min
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(3): 166.     CrossRef
  • The Small Rice Bowl-Based Meal Plan was Effective at Reducing Dietary Energy Intake, Body Weight, and Blood Glucose Levels in Korean Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Hee Jung Ahn, Kyung Ah Han, Hwi Ryun Kwon, Kyung Wan Min
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2010; 34(6): 340.     CrossRef
Effects of Vitamin D and Calcium Intervention on the Improvement of Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Young Mee Choi, Jun Ho Lee, Ji Sook Han
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(4):324-334.   Published online August 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.4.324
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  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Recent reports suggest that the intake of vitamin D and calcium may influence insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vitamin D and calcium intervention on the improvement of blood glucose and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS: Fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), serum 25(OH)D3, serum lipid levels, insulin secretion, and activity and dietary surveys were analyzed in type 2 DM patients both before and after a 12-week vitamin D and calcium intake intervention. RESULTS: The serum 25(OH)D3 level was found to be negatively correlated with insulin resistance and fasting blood glucose. Calcium intake level was also negatively correlated with insulin resistance. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, and HOMA-IR decreased significantly (P <0.05) following vitamin D and calcium intake intervention in the medical nutrition therapy (MNT) group, while there was no such change observed in the control group. Dietary calcium and vitamin D intakes were significantly (P <0.05) higher in the MNT group than in the control group. The concentrations of serum 25(OH)D3 and insulin secretion increased slightly in the MNT group following the 12-week intervention; however, these results did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study indicate that calcium and vitamin D intervention may be helpful in improving fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, serum 25(OH)D3 and HOMA-IR in patients with type 2 DM who have insufficient serum 25(OH)D3 concentrations.

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  • Comparison of Biological Markers and Lifestyle Factors on the Presence of Diabetes Mellitus in Middle-aged adults
    Hye-Sun Keum, Soon-Rim Suh
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2016; 17(2): 104.     CrossRef
  • A prospective randomized controlled trial of the effects of vitamin D supplementation on long-term glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus of Korea
    Ohk-Hyun Ryu, Sungwha Lee, Jaemyung Yu, Moon-Gi Choi, Hyung Joon Yoo, Franco Mantero
    Endocrine Journal.2014; 61(2): 167.     CrossRef
  • A Study of Snack Consumption, Night-Eating Habits, and Nutrient Intake in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus
    Hee-jin Park, JinJu Lee, Ji-Myung Kim, Hyun Ah Lee, Sung-Hoon Kim, Yuri Kim
    Clinical Nutrition Research.2013; 2(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D and Diabetes
    Dallae Ju
    Journal of Korean Diabetes.2011; 12(2): 104.     CrossRef
  • Nutrients and Dish Intake by Fasting Blood Glucose Level
    Jihyun Choi, Hyun-Kyung Moon
    The Korean Journal of Nutrition.2010; 43(5): 463.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D and Diabetes Mellitus
    Jung Hyun Noh
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(4): 276.     CrossRef
The Combination of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Adults.
Chan Hee Lee, Woo Jin Chang, Hyun Hee Chung, Hyun Jung Kim, Sang Hyun Park, Jun Sung Moon, Ji Eun Lee, Ji Sung Yoon, Kyung Ah Chun, Kyu Chang Won, Ihn Ho Cho, Hyoung Woo Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(4):306-314.   Published online August 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.4.306
  • 3,222 View
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  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for detection of diabetes is difficult to perform in clinical settings. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of a more practical detection test, combined fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), as a predictor of diabetes mellitus (DM) in a Korean sample. METHODS: We examined 2,045 (M = 1,276, mean age = 47.8 +/- 9.0 yrs) medical check-up program participants between January 2002 to December 2003. FPG, HbA1c and a number of other biochemical tests were performed at baseline and four after years after initial screening. Patients who originally presented with diabetes were excluded. The characteristics of newly-diagnosed DM patients and non-diabetic patients were compared. RESULTS: The incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes was 1.6% (32/2,045) after four years of follow up. The subjects in the DM group were older, had higher levels of SBP, DBP, FPG, HbA1c, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, GGT and LDH (P < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, FPG (odds ratio [OR] 1.124) and HbA1c (OR 4.794) were significantly correlated with onset of diabetes (P < 0.05). The interaction parameter between FPG and HbA1c was more than 1.0, indicating that the two effects are synergistic. The predictive cut-off values of HbA1c and FPG were 5.35% (area under curve [AUC] = 0.944) and 102.5 mg/dL (AUC = 0.930), respectively. CONCLUSION: The combination of HbA1c above 5.35% and FPG above 102.5 mg/dL predicted the onset of diabetes in a Korean sample. These results suggest that the combination of FPG and HbA1c may be useful for predicting progression to type 2 diabetes in east Asians.

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  • The Distribution and Characteristics of Abnormal Findings Regarding Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c - Based on Adults Except for Known Diabetes
    Seyoung Kwon, Youngak Na
    The Korean Journal of Clinical Laboratory Science.2017; 49(3): 239.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Diabetic Screening Behavior of Korean Adults: A Multilevel Analysis
    Hyeongsu Kim, Minjung Lee, Haejoon Kim, Kunsei Lee, Sounghoon Chang, Vitna Kim, Jun Pyo Myong, Soyoun Jeon
    Asian Nursing Research.2013; 7(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • Impact of HbA1c Criterion on the Detection of Subjects with Increased Risk for Diabetes among Health Check-Up Recipients in Korea
    Hong-Kyu Kim, Sung-Jin Bae, Jaeone Choe
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2012; 36(2): 151.     CrossRef
  • The Utility of HbA1c as a Diagnostic Criterion of Diabetes
    Hee-Jung Kim, Eun Young Choi, Eal Whan Park, Yoo Seock Cheong, Hong-Yoen Lee, Ji Hyun Kim
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2011; 32(7): 383.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Clinical Parameters for the Therapeutic Efficacy of Sitagliptin in Korean Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Soon Ae Kim, Woo Ho Shim, Eun Hae Lee, Young Mi Lee, Sun Hee Beom, Eun Sook Kim, Jeong Seon Yoo, Ji Sun Nam, Min Ho Cho, Jong Suk Park, Chul Woo Ahn, Kyung Rae Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2011; 35(2): 159.     CrossRef
  • Optimal range of HbA1c for the prediction of future diabetes: A 4-year longitudinal study
    Ji Cheol Bae, Eun Jung Rhee, Won Young Lee, Se Eun Park, Cheol Young Park, Ki Won Oh, Sung Woo Park, Sun Woo Kim
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2011; 93(2): 255.     CrossRef
  • The Combination of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Adults (Korean Diabetes J 33(4):306-314, 2009)
    Soo Lim
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(5): 448.     CrossRef
  • The Combination of Fasting Plasma Glucose and Glycosylated Hemoglobin as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes in Korean Adults (Korean Diabetes J 33(4):306-314, 2009)
    Chan Hee Lee, Hyoung Woo Lee
    Korean Diabetes Journal.2009; 33(5): 451.     CrossRef
Association of Spot Urine Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio and 24 Hour-Collected Urine Albumin Excretion Rate in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Jee In Lee, Hyuk Sang Kwon, Su Jin Oh, Jung Min Lee, Sang Ah Chang, Bong Yun Cha, Hyun Shik Son, Tae Seo Sohn
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(4):299-305.   Published online August 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.4.299
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Measuring urine albumin in diabetic patients is an important screening test to identify those individuals at high risk for cardiovascular disease and the progression of kidney disease. Recently, spot urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) has replaced 24 hour-collected urine albumin excretion rate (AER) as a screening test for microalbuminuria given its comparative simplicity. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the degree of correlation between AER and ACR in the normal, microalbuminuric and macroalbuminuric ranges, and to identify the lower limits of ACR for both genders. METHODS: A total of 310 type 2 diabetics admitted to one center were enrolled in the present study. Following the collection of a spot urine sample, urine was collected for 24 hours and albumin content was measured in both specimens. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 60.2 years. A total of 25.4% had microalbuminuria and 15.8% had macroalbuminuria. The data revealed a strongly positive correlation between AER and ACR across all ranges of albuminuria (R = 0.8). The cut-off value of ACR for 30 mg/day of AER by the regression equation was 24 microgram/mg for men, 42 microgram/mg for women and 31.2 microgram/mg for all patients. The diagnostic performance expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.938 (95% CI, 0.911-0.965) for ACR. ACR revealed a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 84%, when a cut-off value of 31.2 microgram/mg was employed. CONCLUSION: ACR was highly correlated with AER, particularly in the range of microalbuminuria. The gender combined cut-off value of ACR in type 2 diabetic patients was determined to be 31.2 microg/mg However, additional studies of large outpatient populations, as opposed to the inpatient population used in the present study, are required to confirm the utility of this value.
The Association Between Urinary Albumin to Creatinine Ratio and Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.
Ju Young Lee, Yeon Kyung Choi, Hyun Ae Seo, Jae Han Jeon, Jung Eun Lee, Seong Su Moon, Jung Guk Kim, Bo Wan Kim, In Kyu Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2009;33(4):289-298.   Published online August 1, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/kdj.2009.33.4.289
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Atherosclerosis, the most common cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients, is closely associated with coronary artery calcium deposition. The coronary calcifications can be easily measured using coronary calcium scoring computed tomography (CT). And microalbuminuria is known as an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease. So, we examined the association of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) and coronary calcification score (CCS) in type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: Among type 2 diabetic patients who underwent the multidetector CT scanning for the evaluation of CCS at Kyungpook National University Hospital between December 2007 and May 2008, 155 subjects were included. CCS, demographic and laboratory data were assessed. RESULTS: Coronary artery calcifications were identified in 90 patients (51%) and mean, median CCS was 205.8 +/- 476.9, 8.74 (0, 132.0). 60 subjects revealed UACR greater than 30 ug/mg. With the UACR increment, CCS revealed a significant increase (P < 0.001). Age, duration of diabetes, serum Apo A1 level, serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level were also associated with CCS. However, after adjusting for age, UACR and CCS exhibited a significant positive relationship (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Increased UACR is associated with coronary artery calcification in type 2 diabetic patients and these results will be useful in early evaluating the presence of macrovascular complications in these patients.

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