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Clinical Care/Education
Factors Associated with Participation in Diabetes Education: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007 to 2009
Jung Min Kim, Jae Won Hong, Jung Hyun Noh, Dong-Jun Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2016;40(6):447-453.   Published online September 20, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2016.40.6.447
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

A recent study revealed that the participation rate in diabetes education among diabetic patients was only about 50% in Korea. We investigated the factors associated with participation in diabetes education.

Methods

The study included 1,255 patients (≥19 years old) diagnosed with diabetes drawn from the total Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007 to 2009 population comprising 30,705 individuals. We compared age, sex, and age- and sex-adjusted clinical characteristics in patients who had received diabetes education versus those who had not.

Results

Of the 1,255 patients, 19.8% (n=248) had received diabetes education. Patients in the group who received diabetes education were younger, diagnosed at an earlier age, had a longer diabetes duration and were more likely to be using insulin therapy compared with the group who did not receive diabetes education (P<0.001). The group who received diabetes education included fewer manual workers (P<0.001) but more college graduates (P=0.004) compared with the group who did not receive diabetes education. Logistic regression analysis revealed that longer diabetes duration increased the likelihood of receiving diabetes education (odds ratio [OR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.06; P=0.004). Junior high school (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.91; P=0.026) and elementary school education levels (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.65; P=0.001) versus college graduation were inversely correlated with participation in diabetes self-management education. Non-insulin therapy reduced the likelihood of receiving diabetes education (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.64; P<0.001).

Conclusion

Longer diabetes duration, insulin therapy, and higher education level were positively associated with the completion of diabetes education.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Management Status of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at General Hospitals in Korea: A 5-Year Follow-Up Study
    Jin Hee Jung, Jung Hwa Lee, Hyang Mi Jang, Young Na, Hee Sun Choi, Yeon Hee Lee, Yang Gyo Kang, Na Rae Kim, Jeong Rim Lee, Bok Rye Song, Kang Hee Sim
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2022; 23(1): 64.     CrossRef
  • Team-based multicomponent care improved and sustained glycaemic control in obese people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a Diabetes Centre setting: A quality improvement program with quasi-experimental design
    Lee-Ling Lim, Eric S.H. Lau, Risa Ozaki, Tammy T.Y. So, Rebecca Y.M. Wong, Elaine Y.K. Chow, Ronald C.W. Ma, Andrea O.Y. Luk, Juliana C.N. Chan, Alice P.S. Kong
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2022; 194: 110138.     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic determinants of attendance at diabetes self-management education program: using Andersen’s behavioral model
    Javad Javan-Noughabi, Seyed Saeed Tabatabaee, Sajad Vahedi, Tahere Sharifi
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sociodemographic Factors Associated with Participation in Diabetes Education among Community-Dwelling Adults with Diabetes
    Young-Hoon Lee
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2020; 61(2): 169.     CrossRef
  • Influence of health education on clinical parameters in type 2 diabetic subjects with and without hypertension: A longitudinal, comparative analysis in routine primary care settings
    Xiu-Jing Hu, Hua-Feng Wu, Yu-Ting Li, Yi Wang, Hui Cheng, Jia-Ji Wang, Bedru H. Mohammed, Isabella Tan, Harry H.X. Wang
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2020; 170: 108539.     CrossRef
  • Disparities in Diabetes Education Program Use by Disability Status Among People with Diabetes: Findings from Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2015
    Junrong Shi, Yong Li
    American Journal of Health Education.2019; 50(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Preferences of Adults With Type 2 Diabetes for Diabetes Self-Management Education Interventions
    Lifeng Fan, Souraya Sidani
    Canadian Journal of Diabetes.2018; 42(6): 645.     CrossRef
  • Antihyperglycemic agent therapy for adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus 2017: a position statement of the Korean Diabetes Association
    Seung-Hyun Ko, Kyu-Yeon Hur, Sang Youl Rhee, Nan-Hee Kim, Min Kyong Moon, Seok-O Park, Byung-Wan Lee, Hyun Jin Kim, Kyung Mook Choi, Jin Hwa Kim
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2017; 32(6): 947.     CrossRef
  • Antihyperglycemic Agent Therapy for Adult Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus 2017: A Position Statement of the Korean Diabetes Association
    Seung-Hyun Ko, Kyu-Yeon Hur, Sang Youl Rhee, Nan-Hee Kim, Min Kyong Moon, Seok-O Park, Byung-Wan Lee, Hyun Jin Kim, Kyung Mook Choi, Jin Hwa Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2017; 41(5): 337.     CrossRef
Clinical Care/Education
Clinical Evaluation of OneTouch Diabetes Management Software System in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Jung Min Kim, Hey Jean Lee, Keum Ok Kim, Jong Chul Won, Kyung Soo Ko, Byung Doo Rhee
Diabetes Metab J. 2016;40(2):129-139.   Published online April 5, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2016.40.2.129
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

OneTouch Diabetes Management Software (OTDMS) is an efficient way to track and monitor the blood glucose level. It is possible to download data from the OneTouch Ultra via the meter's data port, and to transform the numbers of the blood glucose level into a graph, a chart, or statistics. The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether the use of OTDMS in consultation hours would improve patients' knowledge of diabetes mellitus (DM), compliance, satisfaction with doctor and medical treatment, doctor-patient reliability, and glucose control.

Methods

All patients were randomized into either the OTDMS group using OneTouch Ultra or the control groups not using it. Both groups had conventional DM education and only the OTDMS group used data from OTDMS as explanation materials during consultation hours. At enrollment and after 6 months, we performed a questionnaire survey consisting of the diabetes knowledge test, items for compliance of treatment, patient's satisfaction, doctor-patient reliability, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c).

Results

We analyzed 6-month follow-up data from 92 patients (OTDMS 42 vs. control 50). Both groups showed significant improvements in HbA1c, diabetes knowledge, compliance, reliability, and satisfaction after 6 months. However, there were no significant differences between OTDMS and control groups overall. Only "weekly frequency of checking blood glucose level" of compliance and "trying to follow doctor's order" of reliability showed better results in the OTDMS group.

Conclusion

Using the OTDMS system for explanation during consultation hours seems to be more helpful to improve patient's compliance and reliability, especially for checking blood glucose level and trying to follow the doctor's order.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Quality improvement strategies for diabetes care: Effects on outcomes for adults living with diabetes
    Kristin J Konnyu, Sharlini Yogasingam, Johanie Lépine, Katrina Sullivan, Mostafa Alabousi, Alun Edwards, Michael Hillmer, Sathya Karunananthan, John N Lavis, Stefanie Linklater, Braden J Manns, David Moher, Sameh Mortazhejri, Samir Nazarali, P. Alison Pap
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Emerging technologies for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus
    Nirali A. Shah, Carol J. Levy
    Journal of Diabetes.2021; 13(9): 713.     CrossRef
  • Peripartum Management of Gestational Diabetes Using a Digital Health Care Service: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Study
    Ji-Hee Sung, Da Young Lee, Kyoung Pil Min, Cheol-Young Park
    Clinical Therapeutics.2019; 41(11): 2426.     CrossRef
  • Impact of initial active engagement in self-monitoring with a telemonitoring device on glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes
    Min-Kyung Lee, Kwang-Hyeon Lee, Seung-Hyun Yoo, Cheol-Young Park
    Scientific Reports.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Potential of OneTouch Diabetes Management Software System in Real Field for Korean Type 2 Diabetes Patients
    Borami Kang, Jae Hyoung Cho
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2016; 40(2): 115.     CrossRef
Review
The Optimal Cutoff Value of Glycated Hemoglobin for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy
Jung Min Kim, Dong-Jun Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2015;39(1):16-26.   Published online February 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2015.39.1.16
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  • 5 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   

With standardization of measurement of glycated hemoglobin (A1C), the International Expert Committee Report in 2009 and the American Diabetes Association in 2010 recommended incorporating A1C ≥6.5% into the previous diagnostic criteria using fasting plasma glucose and/or 2-hour plasma glucose. Whereas the association of A1C with cardiovascular diseases and other diabetic microvascular complications was linear without evidence of a distinct threshold, several studies suggested a threshold value for A1C in diabetic retinopathy (DR). In studies about the optimal cutoff value for A1C in DR, the A1C values range from 5.2% to 7.8%. There are several possible reasons why these values for DR differ so widely (differences in the definition and/or methods for DR, variation in statistical methods, differences in study population, differences in exclusion criteria, and difference in methods for measuring A1C). With these wide variations in the study method, drawing a conclusive cutoff value for A1C in DR is impossible. In published studies, the cutoff values for moderate or severe DR were higher than those for any or mild DR (6.4% to 7.0% vs. 5.5% to 6.5%).

Citations

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  • What Difference Does a Diagnosis Make?
    Mattan Alalouf, Sarah Miller, Laura R. Wherry
    American Journal of Health Economics.2024; 10(1): 97.     CrossRef
  • EFFECTS OF GLYCEMIC VARIABILITY ON THE PROGRESSION OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY AMONG PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES
    Jae Yong Park, Je Hyung Hwang, Min Ji Kang, Ha Eun Sim, Jae Suk Kim, Kyung Soo Ko
    Retina.2021; 41(7): 1487.     CrossRef
  • Simple diagnosis of HbA1c using the dual-plasmonic platform integrated with LSPR and SERS
    Nam Su Heo, Cheol Hwan Kwak, Hoomin Lee, Dongjoo Kim, Sunmook Lee, Gi-bum Kim, Soonjo Kwon, Woo Sik Kim, Yun Suk Huh
    Journal of Crystal Growth.2017; 469: 154.     CrossRef
  • Insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction in people with prediabetes according to criteria based on glycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin
    Andrea Tura, Christian Göbl, Ermanno Moro, Giovanni Pacini
    Endocrine Journal.2017; 64(1): 117.     CrossRef
  • DIABETIC RETINOPATHY-RISK FACTORS, STAGING & MANAGEMENT
    Naidu A. P. R., Satyavathidevi P
    Journal of Evidence Based Medicine and Healthcare.2016; 3(2): 94.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Glycated Hemoglobin Value for Fasting Plasma Glucose of 126 mg/dL in Korean: The 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Jung Min Kim, Jae Won Hong, Jong Chul Won, Jung Hyun Noh, Kyung Soo Ko, Byoung Doo Rhee, Dong-Jun Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2014;38(6):480-483.   Published online December 15, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2014.38.6.480
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AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   

We aimed to estimate the cutoff value of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, A1c) for fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of 126 mg/dL in the Korean adult population, using the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A total of 5,421 participants without a history of diabetes and over 19 years of age were included in the analysis. A point-wise area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to estimate the optimal A1c cutoff value. A1c threshold of 6.1% produced the highest sum of sensitivity (85.2%) and specificity (90.5%) for FPG of 126 mg/dL (area under the curve, 0.941, P<0.001). A1c of 6.5% produced a sensitivity of 67.7% and specificity of 98.0% for FPG of 126 mg/dL. Considering A1c as one of three criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes and the specificity of an A1c cutoff of 6.5%, the current diagnostic criteria of A1c≥6.5% might be acceptable in the Korean adult population.

Citations

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  • The Effect of an Empowerment Program on the Perceived Risk and Physical Health of Patients With Coronary Artery Disease
    Zeinab Ghasemzadeh Kuchi, Masoomeh Zakerimoghadam, Maryam Esmaeili, Babak Geraiely
    Holistic Nursing Practice.2020; 34(3): 163.     CrossRef
  • Morning Spot Urine Glucose-to-Creatinine Ratios Predict Overnight Urinary Glucose Excretion in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes
    So Ra Kim, Yong-ho Lee, Sang-Guk Lee, Sun Hee Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong-Soo Cha, Hyun Chul Lee, Jeong-Ho Kim, Byung-Wan Lee
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2017; 37(1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Glycosylated Hemoglobin Threshold for Predicting Diabetes and Prediabetes from the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Sangmo Hong, Jun Goo Kang, Chul Sik Kim, Seong Jin Lee, Cheol-Young Park, Chang Beom Lee, Sung-Hee Ihm
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2016; 40(2): 167.     CrossRef
  • Is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Still Valid for Diagnosing Diabetes Mellitus?
    Dong-Lim Kim, Sun-Doo Kim, Suk Kyeong Kim, Sooyoun Park, Kee-Ho Song
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2016; 40(2): 118.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the clinical characteristics of diabetes mellitus diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c: The 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Sangmo Hong, Jun Goo Kang, Chul Sik Kim, Seong Jin Lee, Chang Beom Lee, Sung-Hee Ihm
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.2016; 113: 23.     CrossRef
  • Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331 288 participants
    G Danaei, S Fahimi, Y Lu, B Zhou, K Hajifathalian, M Di Cesare, WC Lo, B Reis-Santos, MJ Cowan, JE Shaw, J Bentham, JK Lin, H Bixby, D Magliano, P Bovet, JJ Miranda, YH Khang, GA Stevens, LM Riley, MK Ali, M Ezzati, ZA Abdeen, KA Kadir, M Abu-Rmeileh, B A
    The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.2015; 3(8): 624.     CrossRef
  • The Optimal Cutoff Value of Glycated Hemoglobin for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy
    Jung Min Kim, Dong-Jun Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2015; 39(1): 16.     CrossRef
Response
Response: Efficacy and Safety of Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70 in Type 2 Diabetes Suboptimally Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Therapy in Korea: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Single-Arm Study (Diabetes Metab J 2013;37:117-24)
Kee-Ho Song, Jung Min Kim, Jung-Hyun Noh, Yongsoo Park, Hyun-Shik Son, Kyong Wan Min, Kyung Soo Ko
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(3):214-215.   Published online June 14, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.3.214
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PDFPubReader   
Original Articles
Corrected QT Interval Prolongation during Severe Hypoglycemia without Hypokalemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Jae Won Beom, Jung Min Kim, Eun Joo Chung, Ju Yeong Kim, Seung Yeong Ko, Sang Don Na, Cheol Hwan Kim, Gun Park, Mi Yeon Kang
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(3):190-195.   Published online June 14, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.3.190
  • 4,856 View
  • 27 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

To evaluate the effects of severe hypoglycemia without hypokalemia on the electrocardiogram in patients with type 2 diabetes in real-life conditions.

Methods

Electrocardiograms of adult type 2 diabetic patients during the episodes of severe hypoglycemia and the recovered stage were obtained and analysed between October 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012. Patients who maintained the normal serum sodium and potassium levels during the episodes of severe hypoglycemia were only selected as the subjects of this study. Severe hypoglycemia was defined, in this study, as the condition requiring active medical assistance such as administering carbohydrate when serum glucose level was less than 60 mg/dL.

Results

Nine type 2 diabetes patients (seven men, two women) were included in the study. The mean subject age was 73.2±7.7 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c level was 6.07%±1.19%. The median duration of diabetes was 10 years (range, 3.5 to 30 years). Corrected QT (QTc) intervals were significantly increased during the episodes of severe hypoglycemia compared to the recovered stage (447.6±18.2 ms vs. 417.2±30.6 ms; P<0.05). However, the morphology and the amplitude of the T waves were not changed and ST-segment elevation and/or depression were not found during the episodes of severe hypoglycemia.

Conclusion

In this study, QTc interval prolongation during the episodes of severe hypoglycemia was observed without hypokalemia. Therefore, the distinct alterations in cardiac repolarization during the episodes of severe hypoglycemia may not be associated with hypokalemia.

Citations

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  • Prevalence of QT prolongation and its risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes
    Khaled Aburisheh, Mohammad F. AlKheraiji, Saleh I. Alwalan, Arthur C. Isnani, Mohamed Rafiullah, Muhammad Mujammami, Assim A. Alfadda
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Celebrities in the heart, strangers in the pancreatic beta cell: Voltage‐gated potassium channels Kv7.1 and Kv11.1 bridge long QT syndrome with hyperinsulinaemia as well as type 2 diabetes
    Anniek F. Lubberding, Christian R. Juhl, Emil Z. Skovhøj, Jørgen K. Kanters, Thomas Mandrup‐Poulsen, Signe S. Torekov
    Acta Physiologica.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Severe Hypoglycemia Increases Dementia Risk and Related Mortality: A Nationwide, Population-based Cohort Study
    Eugene Han, Kyung-do Han, Byung-Wan Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong-Soo Cha, Seung-Hyun Ko, Yong-ho Lee
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.2022; 107(5): e1976.     CrossRef
  • CHANGES IN THE QT INTERVAL IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS
    A. Zayaeva, Galina Koshukova, E. Dolya, A. Nikolayeva, D. Ten
    Tavricheskiy Mediko-Biologicheskiy Vestnik.2022; 23(4): 20.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac Effects of Sulfonylurea-Related Hypoglycemia
    Timothy L. Middleton, Jencia Wong, Lynda Molyneaux, Belinda A. Brooks, Dennis K. Yue, Stephen M. Twigg, Ted Wu
    Diabetes Care.2017; 40(5): 663.     CrossRef
  • Major rapid weight loss induces changes in cardiac repolarization
    Esben Vedel-Larsen, Eva Winning Iepsen, Julie Lundgren, Claus Graff, Johannes J. Struijk, Torben Hansen, Jens Juul Holst, Sten Madsbad, Signe Torekov, Jørgen K. Kanters
    Journal of Electrocardiology.2016; 49(3): 467.     CrossRef
  • Avoiding or coping with severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes
    Jae-Seung Yun, Seung-Hyun Ko
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2015; 30(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Blood electrolyte disturbances during severe hypoglycemia in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes
    Mi Yeon Kang
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2015; 30(5): 648.     CrossRef
  • Vildagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor for the twice-daily treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with or without metformin
    Thomas Forst, Peter Bramlage
    Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy.2014; 15(9): 1299.     CrossRef
  • Does glycemic control reverse dispersion of ventricular repolarization in type 2 diabetes?
    Takayuki Miki, Toshiyuki Tobisawa, Tatsuya Sato, Masaya Tanno, Toshiyuki Yano, Hiroshi Akasaka, Atsushi Kuno, Makoto Ogasawara, Hiromichi Murase, Shigeyuki Saitoh, Tetsuji Miura
    Cardiovascular Diabetology.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hypoglycemia at Admission in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Predicts a Higher 30-Day Mortality in Patients With Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Than in Well-Controlled Patients
    Sang Ah Lee, Suk Ju Cho, Myung Ho Jeong, Young Jo Kim, Chong Jin Kim, Myeong Chan Cho, Hyo-Soo Kim, Youngkeun Ahn, Gwanpyo Koh, Jeong mi Lee, Seok Kyu Oh, Kyeong Ho Yun, Ha Young Kim, Chung Gu Cho, Dae Ho Lee
    Diabetes Care.2014; 37(8): 2366.     CrossRef
Efficacy and Safety of Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70 in Type 2 Diabetes Suboptimally Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Therapy in Korea: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Single-Arm Study
Kee-Ho Song, Jung Min Kim, Jung-Hyun Noh, Yongsoo Park, Hyun-Shik Son, Kyong Wan Min, Kyung Soo Ko
Diabetes Metab J. 2013;37(2):117-124.   Published online April 16, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2013.37.2.117
  • 3,469 View
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  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

The purpose of this study was to evaluate change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), side effects, and quality of life (QOL) after a 16-week treatment period with Biphasic insulin aspart 30/70 (BIasp30) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had been suboptimally controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs).

Methods

The study consisted of a 4-week titration period when concurrent OAD(s) were replaced with BIasp30 and followed by a 12-week maintenance period. All patients completed the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire at the beginning and the end of the trial. Hypoglycemic episodes were recorded by the patient throughout the trial.

Results

Sixty patients were included, of whom 55 patients (92%) completed the full 16-week treatment period. Seven-point blood glucose was significantly improved as compared with the baseline, except for the postlunch blood glucose level. HbA1c at the end of period was significantly improved from 9.2% to 8.2% (P<0.001). Eleven percent (n=6) of patients achieved HbA1c values ≤6.5% and 22% (n=12) of patients achieved <7.0%. There were 3.4 episodes/patients-year of minor hypoglycemia and 0.05 episodes/patients-year of major hypoglycemia. QOL showed significant changes only in the acceptability of high blood glucose category (P=0.003).

Conclusion

Treatment with once or twice daily BIasp30 may be an option for the patients with T2DM suboptimally controlled with OADs in Korea. However, considering the low number of patients achieving the HbA1c target and the high postlunch blood glucose levels, additional management with another modality may be required for optimal control.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • 15 Years of Experience with Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30 in Type 2 Diabetes
    Andreas Liebl, Viswanathan Mohan, Wenying Yang, Krzysztof Strojek, Sultan Linjawi
    Drugs in R&D.2018; 18(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Basal‐prandial versus premixed insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes requiring insulin intensification after basal insulin optimization: A 24‐week randomized non‐inferiority trial
    Sang‐Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim, Kyung Wan Min, Ji Hyun Lee, Kue Jeong Ahn, Jeong Hyun Park, Hak Chul Jang, Seok Won Park, Kwan Woo Lee, Kyu Chang Won, Young‐Il Kim, Choon Hee Chung, Tae Sun Park, Jee‐Hyun Lee, Moon‐Kyu Lee
    Journal of Diabetes.2016; 8(3): 405.     CrossRef
  • The optimal morning:evening ratio in total dose of twice‐daily biphasic insulin analogue in poorly controlled Type 2 diabetes: a 24‐week multi‐centre prospective, randomized controlled, open‐labelled clinical study
    C. H. Jung, J.‐Y. Park, J. H. Cho, K.‐H. Yoon, H. K. Yang, Y.‐H. Lee, B. S. Cha, B.‐W. Lee
    Diabetic Medicine.2014; 31(1): 68.     CrossRef
  • Response: Efficacy and Safety of Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70 in Type 2 Diabetes Suboptimally Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Therapy in Korea: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Single-Arm Study (Diabetes Metab J2013;37:117-24)
    Kee-Ho Song, Jung Min Kim, Jung-Hyun Noh, Yongsoo Park, Hyun-Shik Son, Kyong Wan Min, Kyung Soo Ko
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2013; 37(3): 214.     CrossRef
  • Letter: Efficacy and Safety of Biphasic Insulin Aspart 30/70 in Type 2 Diabetes Suboptimally Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Therapy in Korea: A Multicenter, Open-Label, Single-Arm Study (Diabetes Metab J2013;37:117-24)
    Byung-Wan Lee
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2013; 37(3): 212.     CrossRef
Platelet Aggregability in Type 2 Diabetics.
Chang Hun Lee, Nam Il Cheon, Yeon Sang Lee, Dong Hyeok Cho, Hyun Ho Shin, Jung Min Kim, Dae Ho Lee, Dong Jin Chung, Min Young Chung, Tai Hee Lee
Korean Diabetes J. 2000;24(3):300-309.   Published online January 1, 2001
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Increased platelet aggregability is known to be one of the important risk factors for diabetic vascular complications. The relationship between platelet aggregability and diabetic macrovascular complications, varying severity of diabetic microvascular complications and other possible factors was evaluated in Korean adults. METHODS: Platelet aggregability was measured with platelet rich plasma by addition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in 45 cases. Normal control group (n=15) was compared with diabetics without macrovascular complications (n=15), diabetics with macrovascular complications (n=15) and several groups divided accoring to the severity of microvascular complications. RESULTS: 1) The mean maximum value of platelet aggregation was 70.3+/-5.3% in control group, and 80.0+/-7.3% in diabetics (p<0.005). 2) The mean maximum value of platelet aggregation was 78.0+/-5.5% in diabetics without macrovascular complications and 83.5+/-7.1% in diabetics with macrovascular complications (p=0.093). 3) The mean maximum value of platelet aggregation was 77.0+/-5.1% in normoproteinuria group, 78.1+/-7.3% in microproteinuria group, and 82.9+/-6.2% in overt proteinuria group (p=0.083). 4) The mean maximum value of platelet aggregation was 77.2+/-6.8% in diabetes without neuropathy group and 82.9+/-6.2% in diabetes with neuropathy group (p=0.114). 5) The mean maximum value of platelet aggregation was 79.3+/-4.9% in diabetes with normal funduscopic findings, 80.2+/-7.3% in diabetes with background retinopathy and 81.6+/-7.9% in diabetes with proliferative retinopathy (p=0.852). 6) Blood glucose showed positive correlations with the mean maximum platelet aggregation ( =0.529, p<0.005). CONCLUSION: The elevated mean maximum value of platelet aggregation was found in diabetics and there were no significant differences between macrovascular complications and between varying severity of retinopathy, neuropathy and proteinuria. Blood glucose showed positive correlations with mean maximum platelet aggregation. Hyperglycemia was a major risk factor affecting platelet aggregation in diabetics and its control may play an important role in prevention of diabetic vascular complications.

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