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Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome
The Protective Effects of Increasing Serum Uric Acid Level on Development of Metabolic Syndrome
Tae Yang Yu, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hwan Jee, Ji Cheol Bae, Moon-Kyu Lee, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2019;43(4):504-520.   Published online February 21, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2018.0079
  • 4,684 View
  • 52 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   
Background

It has not been determined whether changes in serum uric acid (SUA) level are associated with incident metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between changes in SUA level and development of MetS in a large number of subjects.

Methods

In total, 13,057 subjects participating in a medical health check-up program without a diagnosis of MetS at baseline were enrolled. Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the independent association of percent changes in SUA level with development of MetS.

Results

After adjustment for age, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, fat-free mass (%), estimated glomerular filtration rate, smoking status, fasting glucose, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and baseline SUA levels, the hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for incident MetS in the second, third, and fourth quartiles compared to the first quartile of percent change in SUA level were 1.055 (0.936 to 1.190), 0.927 (0.818 to 1.050), and 0.807 (0.707 to 0.922) in male (P for trend <0.001) and 1.000 (0.843 to 1.186), 0.744 (0.615 to 0.900), and 0.684 (0.557 to 0.840) in female (P for trend <0.001), respectively. As a continuous variable in the fully-adjusted model, each one-standard deviation increase in percent change in SUA level was associated with an HR (95% CI) for incident MetS of 0.944 (0.906 to 0.982) in male (P=0.005) and 0.851 (0.801 to 0.905) in female (P<0.001).

Conclusion

The current study demonstrated that increasing SUA level independently protected against the development of MetS, suggesting a possible role of SUA as an antioxidant in the pathogenesis of incident MetS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • High prevalence of hyperuricemia and the association with metabolic syndrome in the rural areas of Southwestern China: A structural equation modeling based on the Zhuang minority cohort
    Xiaofen Tang, Shun Liu, Xiaoqiang Qiu, Li Su, Dongping Huang, Jun Liang, Yu Yang, Jennifer Hui Juan Tan, Xiaoyun Zeng, Yihong Xie
    Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.2024; 34(2): 497.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Value of Collagen Biomarkers in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease Patients
    Carina Ureche, Gianina Dodi, Adela Mihaela Șerban, Andreea Simona Covic, Luminița Voroneanu, Simona Hogaș, Radu Andy Sascău, Cristian Stătescu, Adrian Covic
    Biomolecules.2023; 13(2): 389.     CrossRef
  • The bidirectional relationship between metabolic syndrome and hyperuricemia in China: A longitudinal study from CHARLS
    Wen-Yu Chen, Yan-Peng Fu, Min Zhou
    Endocrine.2022; 76(1): 62.     CrossRef
  • Correlation between Serum Oxidative Stress Level and Serum Uric Acid and Prognosis in Patients with Hepatitis B-Related Liver Cancer before Operation
    Maowen Yu, Chaozhu Zhang, Hongbo Tang, Chaohui Xiao, Hangjun Che
    Journal of Healthcare Engineering.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Association between metabolic syndrome and uric acid: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Elena Raya-Cano, Manuel Vaquero-Abellán, Rafael Molina-Luque, Domingo De Pedro-Jiménez, Guillermo Molina-Recio, Manuel Romero-Saldaña
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Acute moderate‐intensity aerobic exercise promotes purinergic and inflammatory responses in sedentary, overweight and physically active subjects
    Cesar Eduardo Jacintho Moritz, Franccesco Pinto Boeno, Alexandra Ferreira Vieira, Samuel Vargas Munhoz, Juliete Nathali Scholl, Amanda de Fraga Dias, Pauline Rafaela Pizzato, Fabrício Figueiró, Ana Maria Oliveira Battastini, Alvaro Reischak‐Oliveira
    Experimental Physiology.2021; 106(4): 1024.     CrossRef
  • Association between baseline and changes in serum uric acid and incident metabolic syndrome: a nation-wide cohort study and updated meta-analysis
    Sen Chen, Nianwei Wu, Chuan Yu, Ying Xu, Chengfu Xu, Yuli Huang, Jian Zhao, Ningxiu Li, Xiong-Fei Pan
    Nutrition & Metabolism.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Can biomarkers be used to improve diagnosis and prediction of metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors? A systematic review
    Vincent G. Pluimakers, Selveta S. van Santen, Marta Fiocco, Marie‐Christine E. Bakker, Aart J. van der Lelij, Marry M. van den Heuvel‐Eibrink, Sebastian J. C. M. M. Neggers
    Obesity Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Inverse associations between serum urate and glycemic status in a general population and in persons with diabetes mellitus
    Ichiro Wakabayashi
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Serum Uric Acid with Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis
    Lu Wang, Tao Zhang, Yafei Liu, Fang Tang, Fuzhong Xue
    BioMed Research International.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Association between Serum Uric Acid and Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans
    Jihyun Jeong, Young Ju Suh
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome
Utility of Serum Albumin for Predicting Incident Metabolic Syndrome According to Hyperuricemia
You-Bin Lee, Ji Eun Jun, Seung-Eun Lee, Jiyeon Ahn, Gyuri Kim, Jae Hwan Jee, Ji Cheol Bae, Sang-Man Jin, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2018;42(6):529-537.   Published online September 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2018.0012
  • 4,359 View
  • 47 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary MaterialPubReader   
Background

Serum albumin and uric acid have been positively linked to metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the association of MetS incidence with the combination of uric acid and albumin levels has not been investigated. We explored the association of albumin and uric acid with the risk of incident MetS in populations divided according to the levels of these two parameters.

Methods

In this retrospective longitudinal study, 11,613 non-MetS participants were enrolled among 24,185 individuals who had undergone at least four annual check-ups between 2006 and 2012. The risk of incident MetS was analyzed according to four groups categorized by the sex-specific medians of serum albumin and uric acid.

Results

During 55,407 person-years of follow-up, 2,439 cases of MetS developed. The risk of incident MetS increased as the uric acid category advanced in individuals with lower or higher serum albumin categories with hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.386 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.236 to 1.554) or 1.314 (95% CI, 1.167 to 1.480). However, the incidence of MetS increased with higher albumin levels only in participants in the lower uric acid category with a HR of 1.143 (95% CI, 1.010 to 1.294).

Conclusion

Higher levels of albumin were associated with an increased risk of incident MetS only in individuals with lower uric acid whereas higher levels of uric acid were positively linked to risk of incident MetS regardless of albumin level.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dissecting the risk factors for hyperuricemia in vegetarians in Taiwan
    Kai-Chieh Chang, Sin-Yi Huang, Wen-Hsin Tsai, Hao-Wen Liu, Jia-Sin Liu, Chia-Lin Wu, Ko-Lin Kuo
    Journal of the Chinese Medical Association.2024; 87(4): 393.     CrossRef
  • A predictive model for hyperuricemia among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Urumqi, China
    Palizhati Abudureyimu, Yuesheng Pang, Lirun Huang, Qianqian Luo, Xiaozheng Zhang, Yifan Xu, Liang Jiang, Patamu Mohemaiti
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Synergistic Interaction between Hyperuricemia and Abdominal Obesity as a Risk Factor for Metabolic Syndrome Components in Korean Population
    Min Jin Lee, Ah Reum Khang, Yang Ho Kang, Mi Sook Yun, Dongwon Yi
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2022; 46(5): 756.     CrossRef
  • Nutritional Biomarkers and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Subacute Stroke
    Eo Jin Park, Seung Don Yoo
    Nutrients.2022; 14(24): 5320.     CrossRef
  • Mean and visit-to-visit variability of glycemia and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction: A longitudinal analysis of 3025 adults with serial echocardiography
    Jiyeon Ahn, Janghyun Koh, Darae Kim, Gyuri Kim, Kyu Yeon Hur, Sang Won Seo, Kyunga Kim, Jae Hyeon Kim, Jeong Hoon Yang, Sang-Man Jin
    Metabolism.2021; 116: 154451.     CrossRef
  • Can biomarkers be used to improve diagnosis and prediction of metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors? A systematic review
    Vincent G. Pluimakers, Selveta S. van Santen, Marta Fiocco, Marie‐Christine E. Bakker, Aart J. van der Lelij, Marry M. van den Heuvel‐Eibrink, Sebastian J. C. M. M. Neggers
    Obesity Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2020 Update: A Report From the American Heart Association
    Salim S. Virani, Alvaro Alonso, Emelia J. Benjamin, Marcio S. Bittencourt, Clifton W. Callaway, April P. Carson, Alanna M. Chamberlain, Alexander R. Chang, Susan Cheng, Francesca N. Delling, Luc Djousse, Mitchell S.V. Elkind, Jane F. Ferguson, Myriam Forn
    Circulation.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between dairy product consumption and hyperuricemia in an elderly population with metabolic syndrome
    Guillermo Mena-Sánchez, Nancy Babio, Nerea Becerra-Tomás, Miguel Á. Martínez-González, Andrés Díaz-López, Dolores Corella, Maria D. Zomeño, Dora Romaguera, Jesús Vioque, Ángel M. Alonso-Gómez, Julia Wärnberg, José A. Martínez, Luís Serra-Majem, Ramon Estr
    Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.2020; 30(2): 214.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of serum uric acid levels in patients with rosacea
    Nermin Karaosmanoglu, Engin Karaaslan, Pınar Ozdemir Cetinkaya
    Archives of Dermatological Research.2020; 312(6): 447.     CrossRef
  • Letter: Increased Serum Angiopoietin-Like 6 Ahead of Metabolic Syndrome in a Prospective Cohort Study (Diabetes Metab J 2019;43:521-9)
    Jin Hwa Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2019; 43(5): 727.     CrossRef
Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome
Serum Calcium and the Risk of Incident Metabolic Syndrome: A 4.3-Year Retrospective Longitudinal Study
Jong Ha Baek, Sang-Man Jin, Ji Cheol Bae, Jae Hwan Jee, Tae Yang Yu, Soo Kyoung Kim, Kyu Yeon Hur, Moon-Kyu Lee, Jae Hyeon Kim
Diabetes Metab J. 2017;41(1):60-68.   Published online December 26, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2017.41.1.60
  • 4,042 View
  • 32 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFPubReader   
Background

An association between serum calcium level and risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been suggested in cross-sectional studies. This study aimed to evaluate the association between baseline serum calcium level and risk of incident MetS in a longitudinal study.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective longitudinal study of 12,706 participants without MetS who participated in a health screening program, had normal range serum calcium level at baseline (mean age, 51 years), and were followed up for 4.3 years (18,925 person-years). The risk of developing MetS was analyzed according to the baseline serum calcium levels.

Results

A total of 3,448 incident cases (27.1%) of MetS developed during the follow-up period. The hazard ratio (HR) for incident MetS did not increase with increasing tertile of serum calcium level in an age- and sex-matched model (P for trend=0.915). The HRs (95% confidence interval [CI]) for incident MetS comparing the second and the third tertiles to the first tertile of baseline serum calcium level were 0.91 (95% CI, 0.84 to 0.99) and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78 to 0.92) in a fully adjusted model, respectively (P for trend=0.001). A decreased risk of incident MetS in higher tertiles of serum calcium level was observed in subjects with central obesity and/or a metabolically unhealthy state at baseline.

Conclusion

There was no positive correlation between baseline serum calcium levels and incident risk of MetS in this longitudinal study. There was an association between higher serum calcium levels and decreased incident MetS in individuals with central obesity or two components of MetS at baseline.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Independent associations of serum calcium with or without albumin adjustment and serum phosphorus with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: results from NHANES 1999-2018
    Haolong Qi, Bin Wang, Lei Zhu
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of the serum calcium level with metabolic syndrome and its components among adults in Taiwan
    Jer-min Chen, Tai-yin Wu, Yi-fan Wu, Kuan-liang Kuo
    Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Elevated Chinese visceral adiposity index increases the risk of stroke in Chinese patients with metabolic syndrome
    Zeyu Liu, Qin Huang, Bi Deng, Minping Wei, Xianjing Feng, Fang Yu, Jie Feng, Yang Du, Jian Xia
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metformin: Expanding the Scope of Application—Starting Earlier than Yesterday, Canceling Later
    Yulia A. Kononova, Nikolai P. Likhonosov, Alina Yu. Babenko
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(4): 2363.     CrossRef
  • Metformin in prediabetes: key mechanisms for the prevention of diabetes and cardiometabolic risks
    A. Yu. Babenko
    Meditsinskiy sovet = Medical Council.2022; (10): 96.     CrossRef
  • Calcium and Phosphate Levels are Among Other Factors Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Normal Weight


    Kamila Osadnik, Tadeusz Osadnik, Marcin Delijewski, Mateusz Lejawa, Martyna Fronczek, Rafał Reguła, Mariusz Gąsior, Natalia Pawlas
    Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy.2020; Volume 13: 1281.     CrossRef
  • Association between selected trace elements and body mass index and waist circumference: A cross sectional study
    Mahnaz Zohal, Saeedeh Jam-Ashkezari, Nasim Namiranian, Amin Moosavi, Akram Ghadiri-Anari
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2019; 13(2): 1293.     CrossRef
  • Letter: Increased Serum Angiopoietin-Like 6 Ahead of Metabolic Syndrome in a Prospective Cohort Study (Diabetes Metab J 2019;43:521-9)
    Jin Hwa Kim
    Diabetes & Metabolism Journal.2019; 43(5): 727.     CrossRef
  • Genotype effects of glucokinase regulator on lipid profiles and glycemic status are modified by circulating calcium levels: results from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study
    Oh Yoen Kim, So-Young Kwak, Hyunjung Lim, Min-Jeong Shin
    Nutrition Research.2018; 60: 96.     CrossRef
Effect of Pancreatic Islet Autotransplantation after Pacreatectomy in Patients with Benign Pancreatic Tumor.
Jae Hwan Jee, Byung Wan Lee, Seung Hoon Oh, Ji Youn Kim, Hyun Jin Kim, Jung Hyun Noh, Sung Ho Choi, Jae Hoon Chung, Yong Ki Min, Myung Sik Lee, Moon Kyu Lee, Kwang Won Kim
Korean Diabetes J. 2004;28(2):88-100.   Published online April 1, 2004
  • 1,627 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Previously, in patients suffering from insulin deficient DM after a partial or total pancreatectomy as treatment for a benign pancreatic tumor, insulin treatment has only led to severe fluctuation in the blood glucose level, and frequently to sudden hypoglycemia due to glucagon deficiency and lack of delicate insulin control. Several worldwide reports have suggested that autologous transplantation of islet cells isolated from an unaffected portion of a resected pancreas, mostly for the cure of chronic pancreatitis or a pancreatic tumor without immunosuppressive agent treatment, resulted in good glycemic control, and even in the prevention of DM. Attempts were made to evaluate the effect of islet autotrans-plantation for glycemic control in eight patients undergoing a pancreatectomy for a benign pancreatic tumor. METHOD: Between December 2001 and October 2003, an islet autotransplantation was performed in eight patients patholologically confirmed with benign pancreatic tumors following a pancreatectomy. There was no past medical history of DM in any of the patients, but impaired glucose tolerance(IGT) was detected in 2 patients on a 75g oral glucose tolerance test(oral GTT), and was also suspected in a pre-pancreatectomy state patient. Islets were isolated by ductal perfusion, using the cold collagenase P and semi-automated method, and purified on a density gradients using a COBE 2991 cell processor or tube system of Ficoll solution. After being confirmed as a benign pancreatic tumor, the cultured islet cells were transplanted to the liver through the portal vein. Each patient was transplanted with a mean islet mass of 3,190+/-896 islet equivalents per kilogram of body weight. The median follow-up period was 12 months, with the longest being 36 months. All patients underwent follow-up for oral GTT, HbA1c and complication of DM, pancreatectomy, or transplantation within this period. RESULTS: On the 75g oral GTT, a normal glucose tolerance(NGT) was maintained until the last follow-up month in five of the eight patients undergoing islet autotransplantation. DM recurred in three of the eight patients undergoing islet autotransplantation, with to cases in a state of IGT and 1 case of NGT at the initial stage. The HbA1c levels were not significantly changed between pre-pancreatectomy and post-islet transplantation period. The amplitude of the decrease in the postprandial 2 hour glucose level was larger than that of the fasting glucose level between the pre- and post-transplantation periods, but this was not statistically. Also, the elevation of the postprandial C-peptide level was larger than the fasting C-peptide during the post-transplantation period, but again, this was not significant. No complications occurred in relation with the islet transplantation, portography, DM and hypoglycemia. CONCLUSION: Islet transplantation could prevent and reverse the diabetic process in patients undergoing a pancreatectomy for a benign pancreatic tumor, with some exception such as those with a small transplanted islet mass or with initial insulin resistance. The 2 hour postprandial changes in the glucose and C- peptide levels on the oral GTT somewhat reflected insulin secretory function of the remaining and newly transplanted islet cells. Pancreatic islet autotransplantation is the most prospective method for the prevention or cure of insulin deficient DM following a pancreatectomy for a benign pancreatic tumor.

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