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Lin Xu 2 Articles
Metabolic Risk/Epidemiology
Association of Measures of Glucose Metabolism with Colorectal Cancer Risk in Older Chinese: A 13-Year Follow-up of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Substudy and Meta-Analysis
Shu Yi Wang, Wei Sen Zhang, Chao Qiang Jiang, Ya Li Jin, Tong Zhu, Feng Zhu, Lin Xu
Diabetes Metab J. 2024;48(1):134-145.   Published online January 3, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4093/dmj.2022.0383
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Background
Abnormal glucose metabolism is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). However, association of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with CRC risk remains under-reported. We examined the association between glycemic indicators (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, 2-hour glucose, 2-hour insulin, and homeostasis model of risk assessment-insulin resistance index) and CRC risk using prospective analysis and meta-analysis.
Methods
Participants (n=1,915) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Substudy were included. CRC events were identified through record linkage. Cox regression was used to assess the associations of glycemic indicators with CRC risk. A meta-analysis was performed to investigate the association between HbA1c and CRC risk.
Results
During an average of 12.9 years follow-up (standard deviation, 2.8), 42 incident CRC cases occurred. After adjusting for potential confounders, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) of CRC for per % increment in HbA1c was 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.63) in overall population, 1.51 (95% CI, 1.13 to 2.02) in women and 1.06 (95% CI, 0.68 to 1.68) in men. No significant association of other measures of glycemic indicators and baseline diabetes with CRC risk was found. Meta-analyses of 523,857 participants including our results showed that per % increment of HbA1c was associated with 13% higher risk of CRC, with the pooled risk ratio being 1.13 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.27). Subgroupanalyses found stronger associations in women, colon cancer, Asians, and case-control studies.
Conclusion
Higher HbA1c was a significant predictor of CRC in the general population. Our findings shed light on the pathology of glucose metabolism and CRC, which warrants more in-depth investigation.

Diabetes Metab J : Diabetes & Metabolism Journal